Coordinated by Brake  spons spec savers Support think

Road Safety Week Blog

A collection of views from around the UK on the topics of Step up for Safe Streets and Road Safety Week. These blogs are aimed to inform and inspire people to take action and raise awareness during 2019 and beyond. Contributions are from Brake staff, volunteers, partners, researchers and campaigners, where views expressed are those of the contributor and do not necessarily represent those of Brake or its employees.

Safe Streets for our children

RSW19_Blog_Road_Safety_GB

Road Safety GB's Liz Brooker talks about why it is vital that we create an environment that allows children to walk or cycle safely to school and in their community

As the long summer days are rapidly shortening, the autumn coolness is almost upon us, I was thinking about the amount of activity we see in the parks in summer holidays. Parents out with their children walking and cycling – this led me to reflect on when my (now grown up) children started to walk, long before the days where I could film their first steps on my phone.

Initial feeling of pride, quickly followed moving everything that could be pulled off of a shelf. That one memory of my daughter teetering at the top of the stairs with a massive grin while I slowly and stealthily made a grab to save her from falling! How very quickly I fitted a stairgate!! Now I relate my memories to the work I do in road safety……children must be able to walk and explore in safety.  The environment we design for all road users is as important as the indoor environment parents create to keep their children safe at home.

We know people make mistakes, yes that’s all of us, and there are times we may not admit it was a mistake but we know we could have done better!  Children especially make mistakes, or its more accurate to say they do what adults least expect because we don’t think like children; but there are also times when we all act like children, how many times do we hear someone say ’oh grow up’ or ‘he or she is so immature’- so if we know this is true, we need to make sure everything we do can accommodate for lapses or errors. So if people, that is ‘we’ make mistakes on the road, regardless of age, experience and knowledge, is it right to pay for it? We need to make sure the environment is designed to minimise the risk that the mistake we make will result in a life changing or life ending event.  Cars have seat belts, airbags and isofix systems to help protect those travelling in the car.  Our roads need the same considerations to make sure we are safe as pedestrians, motorcyclists or cyclists. 

Many London Boroughs are piloting School Streets; closing the road at crucial times of the school day to allow children to enter and leave school in a car-free area. Whilst this is fine for roads that lend themselves to being closed, but we also need to consider what we can do on the roads that cannot be closed – this may be looking at other options, may be the entrances that the children use can be changed. 

The most important factor is that together we allow children who want to walk or cycle to school to be able to do so in an environment that is as safe as the one we create when they first learn to walk or cycle, that we celebrate the fact our children can walk to school in a social and safe setting free from fear and danger.

How Bikeability fits in to ‘Step up for Safe Stree...
Don’t be seduced by autonomous vehicles
 

Comments 2

Guest - David Budgen on Friday, 06 December 2019 10:06

I live in a Close, that is used as a drop of point for the local junior school and the driving and parking leaves a lot to be desired.

The common problems are:
1. Parking on road junctions, this is not helped by a resident who can not see the problems he creates.
2. Driving on pavements.
3. Using private drives to turn around.
4. Parking, so that to put children into the car they open the door into the road.

The first 3 items are covered by the Highway Code or laws that stand in the UK and the fourth item should be common sense.

But parking is enforced by Sussex Police, who state that parking enforcement is a low priority and will only deal with the problem if a fatality occurs, additional double yellow lines are not a priority with East Sussex County Council, as when research is carried out, not a school times there is no need for them. The school headmaster does make a note in the monthly school paper sent to parents asking them to consider the residents, but that is like water off a ducks back.

I live in a Close, that is used as a drop of point for the local junior school and the driving and parking leaves a lot to be desired. The common problems are: 1. Parking on road junctions, this is not helped by a resident who can not see the problems he creates. 2. Driving on pavements. 3. Using private drives to turn around. 4. Parking, so that to put children into the car they open the door into the road. The first 3 items are covered by the Highway Code or laws that stand in the UK and the fourth item should be common sense. But parking is enforced by Sussex Police, who state that parking enforcement is a low priority and will only deal with the problem if a fatality occurs, additional double yellow lines are not a priority with East Sussex County Council, as when research is carried out, not a school times there is no need for them. The school headmaster does make a note in the monthly school paper sent to parents asking them to consider the residents, but that is like water off a ducks back.
Guest - Graham on Tuesday, 05 November 2019 21:03

If Roadsafety GB are so keen on children being able to get to school safely why is it that their guidance which is used to assess walking routes to schools doesn't:
A) have any requirements for children who have to travel up to 3 miles each way to school for being able to even get a cycle along the route
B) don't require crossing points to meet current standards
C) can route children through isolated woods with no natural surveillance

If Roadsafety GB are so keen on children being able to get to school safely why is it that their guidance which is used to assess walking routes to schools doesn't: A) have any requirements for children who have to travel up to 3 miles each way to school for being able to even get a cycle along the route B) don't require crossing points to meet current standards C) can route children through isolated woods with no natural surveillance
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Wednesday, 03 June 2020

Captcha Image